Wird diese Nachricht nicht richtig dargestellt, klicken Sie bitte hier.
February 2018

CONTENT 


NEWS FROM THE LANDBELL GROUP  
European Recycling Platform collects and treats 3 million tonnes of electronic waste
New rules regarding authorized representatives in Portugal
Collection trials finish in Critical Raw Material Closed Loop Recovery project


THE LANDBELL GROUP INTRODUCES ITSELF
Interview with Patrycja Winiarz 

UPDATE FROM BRUSSELS  

ENVIRONMENTAL COMPLIANCE NEWS - EUROPE
Political deal on the Circular Economy Package 
Transition towards a resource efficient circular economy in Europe: policy lessons from the EU and the member states
Plastic waste: A European strategy to protect the planet, defend citizens, and boost the economy
EU plastics strategy inspires member states to take action
The European plastics industry undertakes voluntary commitments
ECHA to consider restrictions on the use of oxo-plastics and microplastics
Blueprint for plastics packaging waste: Quality sorting & recycling
Waste Shipment Rules


ENVIRONMENTAL COMPLIANCE NEWS - INTERNATIONAL
The Global E-Waste Monitor 2017


INNOVATIONS AND FORERUNNERS  
$1 million for innovations to tackle ocean plastic pollution
Finalist of the Green Alley Award 2017: Newcy
Call to step up coffee cup recycling in battle on plastic waste


DID YOU KNOW THAT... ?  
Simple energy-efficient recycling process for lithium-ion batteries
NFL announces zero waste plan for Super Bowl


EVENTS

<a name="newslandbell"></a>
European Recycling Platform collects and treats 3 million tonnes of electronic waste


European Recycling Platform (ERP), a Landbell Group company, has reached a significant milestone by collecting and treating more than 3 million tonnes of waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) across Europe since its foundation in 2002. This number equals the amount of WEEE generated by the entire European Union in one year. The recycling of WEEE not only saves valuable natural resources, but also contributes to improving both the environment and human health. ERP has produced an infographic to highlight some of the environmental benefits of recycling 3 million tonnes of e-waste, including preventing the emission of more than 32 million tonnes of CO2.

This achievement once again underlines the important role ERP is playing in the European recycling market. Thanks to its unique pan-European scope (a network of 35 compliance schemes in 15 countries), its unrivalled experience and expertise, its innovative recycling strategies, and its creation of opportunities for pan-European recycling services, ERP is making a significant contribution to developing a more circular economy in Europe.
Find out more

New rules regarding authorized representatives in Portugal


The Portuguese government has issued a decree setting new rules for the waste market. Decree 152-D/2017 – which was published on 11th December 2017 and entered into force on 1st January 2018 – covers the management of many important waste streams like packaging, batteries and electronic waste.

The new framework strengthens the principle of extended producer responsibility, which makes producers responsible for financing the management of their products and packaging at end-of-life. Producers selling products from outside Portugal need to appoint an authorised representative who is then responsible for fulfilling the obligations of this law on their behalf.

The Landbell Group company, Waste Trends, provides an authorized representative service in Portugal, which meets the requirements of Decree 152-D/2017, for producers, packer/fillers or service packaging suppliers. 
Contact us for more information

Collection trials finish in Critical Raw Material Closed Loop Recovery project


The Critical Raw Material (CRM) Closed Loop Recovery project has announced that the five trial partners of the project have now completed the collection stage of the trials, with significant amounts of devices such as smartphones, laptops and personal computers collected.

The EU LIFE funded project is investing in trials exploring new ways of boosting the collection and recovery of CRMs from household WEEE, and aims to increase the recovery of target CRMs by 5% by 2020 and by 20% by 2030.

Held across the UK, Italy, Germany and the Czech Republic, the collection mechanisms ranged from retailer take-back schemes to business collections, and included trial partners such as John Lewis, Dixons Carphone, Enviropol, Fraunhofer IWKS and Institut für Materialprüfung Glörfeld GmbH.

The materials collected are now being tested to recover CRMs, with a full evaluation being undertaken to demonstrate reuse potential and the amount recovered from the different methods used. The Landbell Group company, ERP UK, is one of the project partners.
Find out more

Interview with Patrycja Winiarz, Environmental Compliance Manager, Landbell Group 

What’s your job at Landbell Group, Ms Winiarz?
As an Environmental Compliance Manager, I support global companies with their various producer obligations across Europe and beyond. I’m currently responsible for a complex programme providing one of our major accounts with an umbrella of services in multiple countries, ranging from data reporting and managing their day-to-day relations with producer compliance schemes and the authorities through to ongoing consultancy, providing advice on regulatory changes, as well as benchmarking to ensure they are getting the best value compliance. 

What are your most important tasks and challenges?  
The diversity of tasks, and the constant analysis of changing regulations and their potential impact on producers, makes my daily work fascinating. My role is not only about meeting customer expectations, but supporting them with simple administrative tasks. I also have a chance to develop and put into place new processes and solutions which allow us to re-think our approach to compliance. I act as a bridge between the customer and countless stakeholders. Dealing with cultural, language and, most importantly, regulatory differences can be challenging. The international nature of my role is what I enjoy most.  

How did you end up at Landbell Group? 
I have a financial background and, while working for an investment bank, I spent a lot of time on assignment in the United Kingdom in 2013. I fell in love with London and decided to relocate and look for new challenges here. I joined our Group in 2014 and had a chance to shape one of our first pan-European solutions, EuropePlus, by building up expertise on international extended producer responsibility, as well as our relationships with other schemes outside of the countries where we operate directly. After EuropePlus became a well-established product, I started to focus on tailor-made, consultancy projects. I now work within our Consultancy division. 

What do you do for the environment in your private life? 
We all seem to understand the importance of the environment and the fact that we need to take care of it; unfortunately, we often say that we can’t change the world on our own. I don’t believe this is true. Change always start within and small steps matter.  In my personal life, I make sure, for example, that we segregate all waste in our household. I get involved in bigger initiatives by making simple choices and, wherever possible, buy sustainably sourced or organic products. Going shopping without one of my funny, reusable bags is a no-go! 


Two topics have dominated recent political discussions in Brussels: the deal on the Circular Economy Package and the publication of the Plastics Strategy. A summary is provided below. 

Please see separate articles for additional information. 

Circular Economy Package
The three European institutions finally reached a compromise on the Circular Economy Package, after nearly two years of discussions, and agreed on a new framework for reducing the amount of waste in Europe and further increasing recycling rates. Landbell Group welcomes the introduction of minimum requirements for extended producer responsibility (EPR) schemes, in particular, as they will help to establish a more level playing field and increase competition. EPR will also become mandatory for packaging in all Member States by 2025, which should increase recycling rates and reduce costs for producers and consumers. The Circular Economy Package is expected to be officially adopted in April and will then be transposed by Member States into national law.

The Waste Framework Directive text was endorsed by the Council’s Committee of Permanent Representatives (COREPER) on Friday 23rd February. The European Parliament’s Environment Committee will vote on it on Tuesday 27th February and the final Plenary vote is planned for 16th April.

Plastics Strategy
On 16th January, the European Commission published its long-awaited Plastics Strategy. To reduce the amount of plastic waste, one of the measures that the Commission proposes is to review the Packaging and Packaging Waste Directive. This would be a great opportunity to harmonise the rules further and ensure packaging is recycled in a cost-effective manner.


Political deal on the Circular Economy Package 


A few days before the Christmas break, the European Commission, Parliament, and Council finally reached a compromise in the trialogue negotiations on the Circular Economy Package. The three institutions agreed on amending six legislatives acts, thereby defining the framework for Europe’s waste market for the next decade. Before entering into force, the package needs to be officially adopted by the European Parliament and Council.

The political deal negotiated under the Estonian Council Presidency includes setting higher targets for the recycling of municipal waste and packaging waste, as well as implementing several instruments for reducing the amount of waste in general. In addition, there will be minimum requirements for producer responsibility organisations aimed at creating a more level playing field and more competition within the waste market, which Landbell Group welcomes and has argued for in political discussions (see position paper from December 2017).

With the political issues finally solved, the three institutions are now working on the technical details of the package which will amend, among other things, the Waste Framework Directive and the Directive on Packaging and Packaging Waste. After this alignment phase, which is expected to last until spring, there will be another vote in the European Parliament on the final package which the Council needs to officially approve in order to reach a first reading agreement. The national implementation phase then begins, in which Member States are required to transpose the regulations into national law.


Transition towards a resource efficient circular economy in Europe: policy lessons from the EU and the member states


In recent years the EU has made several commitments towards building a more resource efficient economy. A new study maps out the current policy measures undertaken to achieve this goal at EU level, and delves into the national policy plans of selected Member States. The analysis identifies the problem of competing goals and objectives in different policies. This conflict impedes the effectiveness of the different policy measures, slowing down the overall process. Following the analysis of the different policies on multiple levels, the study also gives recommendations on how to fashion policies more effectively to cope with the desired outcome and harmonise EU and national legislation.
Download the study here

Plastic waste: A European strategy to protect the planet, defend citizens, and boost the economy


The European Union has adopted a Plastics Strategy with measures to protect the environment from plastic pollution and boost growth, investment and innovation. The strategy aims to transform recycling into a profitable solution for businesses - not an obstacle – and will curb plastic waste and ocean litter.

A core group of EU Commissioners, including Frans Timmermans, have taken a large step towards improving the circular economy in Europe with this Plastics Strategy paper, which the Commission adopted on 16th January and which will be tabled in the Council later this year. Key elements of the paper focus on the strategy for plastics in the circular economy, a communication on the interface between chemicals, products and waste, a monitoring framework for the circular economy, as well as a directive on port reception facilities.

Stakeholder hearings closed on 12th February, initiating the next steps in the legislative pipeline.

Landbell Group welcomes the package as an important step towards a circular economy. 
See position paper

EU plastics strategy inspires member states to take action


In the wake of the EU plastics strategy, many EU Member States have now begun adopting national measures. For example, the United Kingdom has banned microbeads in beauty products and plans to undertake further steps to encourage the use of reusable bags. Scotland plans to ban plastic straws by the end of 2019, and in Italy consumers will soon have to purchase biodegradable bags for fruit and vegetables. Greece is also banning single-use plastic and implementing a charge for plastic carrier bags at supermarkets.


The European plastics industry undertakes voluntary commitments


Producers of plastics and compounds are voluntarily committing to increasing the proportion of recycled plastics in their supply chain. The European Plastics Converters (EuPC), Plastics Recyclers Europe (PRE), Polyolefin Circular Economy Platform Europe (PCEP), and many others have released the paper “The European Plastics Industry Circular Economy Voluntary Commitments. Towards 50% Plastics Waste Recycling”.

These representatives of the plastics industry are joining forces to:
• establish European circularity platforms and value chain initiatives;
• increase the uptake of more recycled polymers by converters and brand owners; and
• organise 50 cross-sectoral seminars and workshops by 2020 to promote dialogue between stakeholders in Europe with the aim of improving the quality level of recycled polymers.

The project partners are also planning to produce a catalogue of 500 polymer compounds with a minimum 50% recycling rate by 2020 at the latest.

Download here

ECHA to consider restrictions on the use of oxo-plastics and microplastics


The problem of microplastics in the oceans, and further down the food chain on our plates, is of increasing concern. This is why the EU Commission has asked the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA) to prepare policy proposals targeting issues such as intentionally added microplastics in toothpastes or other cosmetics, and oxo-plastics - compounds that rapidly degrade into microplastics. Stakeholders across the entire supply chain will also be invited to hearings to help the Commission develop the most practical solutions to the problem.

Find out more

Blueprint for plastics packaging waste: Quality sorting & recycling


A new study by the Brussels-based association Plastics Recyclers Europe and Deloitte Sustainability suggests that the 65% recycling target for plastic packaging is achievable by 2025. In order to achieve that goal, recyclability has to become an integral part of product design, the researchers suggest. Furthermore, through a substantial increase in the reuse of plastic packaging, some 80% of CO2 emissions could be saved and over 115,000 jobs could be created. Adopting a holistic approach, the report addresses all stakeholders - from the Commission and other legislative bodies to producers, retailers, and NGOs - assigning each a key role in realising the goal. Additionally, separate collection or deposit schemes are suggested as possible policy options. In conjunction with a ban on landfill and limitating waste incineration to non-recyclable materials, these policy measures are key to meeting the target.

Download here

Waste Shipment Rules


The European Commission has begun a consultation on the Waste Shipment Regulation, which lays down rules for controlling waste shipments to improve environmental protection. The Regulation is expected to be revised by 2020.

Landbell Group will contribute to the discussion by providing the experience gained by its company, European Recycling Platform (ERP), the only pan-European producer responsibility organisation for WEEE, batteries and packaging. ERP always aims to recycle at the most efficient plant – in terms of quality and cost – which sometimes requires the shipment of waste. 


The Global E-Waste Monitor 2017


The United Nations University and its Sustainability Cycles (SCYCLE) programme, along with the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) and the International Solid Waste Association (ISWA), have published the Global E-Waste Monitor 2017. The report highlights the growing challenge of e-waste in a world with an increasing demand for internet access and mobile networks. Despite being a driver for socioeconomic development, increased production of electronic devices also results in skyrocketing amounts of e-waste, hampering sustainable development.

The report provides a comprehensive overview of the global growth in e-waste, highlighting the importance of waste reduction, appropriate disposal and recycling. Global production of e-waste reached 45 million tonnes in 2016 – the equivalent of 4,500 Eiffel Towers - and continues to rise rapidly. However, regulatory measures have begun to take effect: in 2014 only 44% of the world’s population was covered by e-waste legislation; this number rose to 66% in 2017. The report also highlights the economic opportunities in e-waste as materials worth €55 billion can be recovered.

Find out more

$1 million for innovations to tackle ocean plastic pollution


The Ellen McArthur Foundation held an event at this year’s World Economic Forum Annual Meeting in Davos, awarding a total of $1 million to recycling innovations in the plastic packaging industry. The foundation’s objective is to support innovation to reduce packaging waste and plastic packaging which is not recyclable due to its complex compound mix. Working with NineSigma, who helped identify viable solutions around the world, the winners of the different categories received $200,000 each and will now begin a 12 month accelerator program. Winners included compostable materials made of by-products from agriculture and forestry, specialised nanotechnology that increases the recyclability of materials, and coatings that increase the performance of biopolymers.


Copyright @Newcy

Finalist of the Green Alley Award 2017: Newcy


The numbers are clear: disposable cups have had their day. In France alone, 4.7 billion disposable cups are thrown away annually. Starting in 2020, the French government will prohibit the use of all types of disposable cups, which is where Newcy comes in. The Rennes-based startup offers consumers the opportunity to keep drinking vending-machine coffee with one major difference: the used cups are collected in a machine, washed at a plant, and then reused in the vending machines. This innovation captures the trend across the continent, where an increasing amount of policymakers, consumers, and vendors are looking to change our throwaway culture – of which the to-go coffee cup has become a symbol.

To the Green Alley Award

Call to step up coffee cup recycling in battle on plastic waste


The UK has introduced a new initiative to increase the recycling of coffee cups. Currently, only 1% of the 2.5 billion coffee cups used a year are recycled. The current process is costly and the results are poor. The plastic lining on the inside of the cups poses challenges to recyclers, making it more cost efficient to incinerate or landfill the cups. So a proposed 25 pence levy for disposable cups is intended to make the recycling process financially more viable, getting more businesses into the habit of recycling. There are some recyclers with plants capable of recycling coffee cups and, whilst the final material is not suitable for use in the food industry, it can be repurposed into other items.


Simple energy-efficient recycling process for lithium-ion batteries


A new method for more energy efficient recycling of lithium-ion batteries has been developed. Conventional methods crush the batteries and dissolve the granulate in acid. The resultant product is separated metals like lithium, cobalt and nickel, however the microstructure which has been carefully engineered in energy intensive processes is lost and, to be reused, the materials have to undergo the processes again. The new method leaves the microstructure intact, which is important for battery performance, saving the energy not required for restructuring. Only about 5% of lithium-ion batteries are currently recycled, but the amount of electric vehicles is expected to increase significantly in the next decade, along with the amount of these highly toxic, flammable, but valuable waste batteries for recycling.

Landbell Group’s Global Take-Back Team has industry-leading expertise and experience in the take-back and recycling of lithium-ion batteries. 

Contact us for more information

NFL announces zero waste plan for Super Bowl


Working with all of the organisers behind this year’s Super Bowl, the National Football League (NFL) announced the ambitious goal of recycling 90% of the stadium’s waste on the day. The expected 40 tonnes will be collected by chefs, stewards, and fans alike. Besides the recycling of bottles, cups, and food packaging, the NFL Environmental Program also intends to donate décor and construction materials to local organisations for repurposing.



Wenn Sie diese E-Mail (an: unknown@noemail.com) nicht mehr empfangen möchten,
können Sie diese hier kostenlos abbestellen.
Wenn Sie diesen Report abonnieren möchten, klicken Sie hier.
 
Landbell AG für Rückhol-Systeme
Rheinstr. 4L
55116 Mainz
Deutschland

06131-235652-800
newsletter@landbell.de